CD#22 – Have you had a Conversation yet?

The strapline of The Conversation is ‘Academic rigour, journalistic flair’. The publication describes itself as, ‘an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public’. When one is constantly being bombarded with allegations of ‘fake news’, it is reassuring to have a news source founded on academic research and thriving on academic debate. The Conversation aims to be just a source. Certainly, from the non-researcher’s perspective the content makes interesting reading – from the number of coffee shops in the UK to recognising ADHD in your child, to the fate of Mugabe. It’s now high up on The Castle Drum’s list of favourite reads.

So what about the publication from a researcher’s perspective? It’s probable that very few would dispute that research in and of itself is interesting, but research which has real-world impact has even greater value. The Conversation serves as a platform to ensure that academics, who have expertise built up through years of research, have a chance to deliver such impact, by providing data, analysis and evidence – not necessarily terms associated with today’s internet journalism.

In July, Queen’s became a founding member of The Conversation Canada. The publication launched in Australia in 2011 and has been around in the UK since 2013. Whether you publish in the Canadian or the UK edition, we would urge you to publish in The Conversation. It is an excellent, free source in which to publish your research and further your name as an expert in your field. As a moderated source there are guidelines to follow, but these are straightforward and eminently sensible in an academic environment. If you are interested in becoming an author, you can do so here.

Peter Lowe, Research Director and Associate Professor in English Literature, published an article in The Conversation UK back in January. He notes, ‘It’s an excellent forum for making academic research topical and accessible. Once your proposal has been accepted they’re very helpful with the process of getting your work up on the site, and I think there are many of us here [at the BISC] who could contribute both to the Canadian version and to the UK one, especially as Brexit-related news stories make discussions of ‘British identity’ in the world so topical.’

If you are interested in following Peter’s example, sign up as an author. And please don’t forget to tell The Castle Drum when you have published something – we’d love to tell everyone else!

»Starting a conversation since January 2017«